MCCHOF 2008 Inductees

2008 Coaches

Hall of Fame Inductees

Fran

Murphytwice honored as

Football Coach of the Year, led his high school alma mater, Upper Merion, High

to 1971 and 1972 Suburban League championships, and piloted the Pennsylvania Big

33 squad to a 21-19 victory over Archie Griffin-led Ohio in 1973. A 35-year

Upper Merion faculty member, Murphy led his varsity gridmen to a 96-51-4 record

over 15 seasons (a .653 winning percentage). In 1999, two decades

after retiring as Upper Merion head coach, he was named Honorary

Coach at the Montgomery County All-Star Football Game.

 

Libby

Williams

coached with great success in

Montgomery County at Plymouth-Whitemarsh High School (Girls’ Athletic Director)

and Ursinus College following five undefeated field hockey and five undefeated

basketball seasons at Upper Darby High. A member of the U.S. Field Hockey Assn.

and the U.S. Lacrosse Hall of Fame, Ms. Williams also served as the Canadian

National Lacrosse team’s head coach. At Plymouth-Whitemarsh she coached

basketball and led the filed hockey team (61-14-6) to five

championships and guided the lacrosse squad (92-13 in 14 years) to

eight titles.

 

James

(Skip) Wilson – ranks second

only to legendary Connie Mack in number of lifetime victories

managed/coached by a Philadelphia professional or college baseball

pilot. His Temple Owls posted a total of 1,034 wins, twice advanced

to the College World Series in Omaha, and went to 14 NCAA

post-season tournaments. Temple’s baseball field, at its Ambler,

Montgomery County campus, was officially named in his honor in

April, 2007. A Montgomery County resident for nearly three decades,

Wilson is a multiple Hall of Fame entrant, including Temple

University (1981) and the American Baseball Coaches Assn. (1987). As

a reflection of his mentoring, more than 100 of Wilson’s Temple

players advanced to professional baseball careers.

 

Larry

Wilson – is now in his 31st consecutive school

year as head track & field and cross country coach at Montgomery County’s

Gwynned Mercy Academy. He has produced individual champions (17 Pennsylvania

Division AA titles and 60 District AA crowns), and has led Gwynned Mercy to

District and Bicentennial League championships. His 4 X 800 relay

team set a state standard by winning the Pennsylvania AA meet five

successive years. Wilson’s runners have also captured the 1500 meter

event at the Penn Relays. He’s been an assistant at two l

international meets, and was head USA coach at the 1981 National

Sports Festival.


2008

Community Coaches

Honor Roll Inductees

Anthony

Cianciulli

along with his close friend Al Bertucci, brought Perkiomen Valley Twilight

League baseball back to Norristown after a long layoff. In 1980 they founded the

Norristown A’s. For 28 years from 1980 to 2007 Cianciulli was the owner of the

A’s and saw the franchise become one of the perennial powerhouses in Perkiomen

Valley Twilight League history. During the 28 years the A’s made it

to the final’s an amazing 19 times and won 12 titles. He also served as a Norristown councilman for nearly 10 years

and it was during that time that he oversaw the improvements to old Latshaw

Field in Norristown, adding lights, improving the overall facility and turning

it into the Red McCarthy Complex at Latshaw Field, a facility that is used by

many and leagues from the area. He also oversaw the fundraising for the

improvements, including a cablethon, that kept the burden of finances from

falling on taxpayers.

 

Albert

Bertucci

Al Bertucci sadly passed away in March of 2004, but he left behind a unbelievable

legacy of winning. Bertucci was founder, owner and general manager of one of the

great softball powerhouses ever to grace Montgomery County. From 1965 to 1989 Bertucci owned the Al’s

Cold Cut softball team that won an impressive 13 Norristown Civic League titles,

eight Conshohocken Softball League titles and seven Bridgeport slow pitch

titles. Throughout the years in league and playoffs the team had a remarkable 84

percent winning percentage. Al’s Cold Cuts also won the Pennsylvania Class A

state championship in both 1984 and 1986. Despite his almost nightly involvement with softball and

baseball, Bertucci found time to serve on Norristown Borough Council from 1980

to 1984 and was a very active member of Plymouth Country Club.

 

Frank

Zoltowski

a true son of Conshohocken, has served the community on two different levels. In

1965 he signed on as the assistant coach for the Saint Matthews varsity boys CYO

basketball team. Halfway through the year he assumed the head coach role and

held it, along with athletic director duties, for the next 30 years. During that

tenure he won seven division titles and three region titles with the boys, while

often helping coach girls’ teams. Even since his semi-retirement in 1995, he has

stayed active with the CYO program.  Zoltowski also managed teams in the

Conshohocken Babe Ruth baseball League, as well as volunteering as a coach and

scorekeeper in the Sutcliff Park summer basketball league.  But his

greatest love has been the Fellowship House, where he has been employed for 40

years. Zoltowski never recognized the time clock, spending countless hours

helping with kickball, basketball, volleyball and – his greatest love – the

Albert C. Donofrio high school basketball tournament.


2008

Lifetime Achievement Award

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tom

Lasorda – Popular Norristown native and distinguished member of

baseball’s National Hall of Fame, Tommy Lasorda,

was installed in the Coaches Hall’s initial class in November, 2002 at Westover

Country Club. Lasorda will return to our county to receive another special salute. From

time to time, but not necessarily annually, the Coaches Hall of Fame presents

its prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award. In this Olympic year, with his

baseball team’s stunning gold medal victory over Cuba in 2002 still burning as

one of the greatest Olympic triumphs, Tom Lasorda has been selected as the 2008

recipient. Lasorda’s managerial achievements with the Los Angeles Dodgers are

well-known. But capping his remarkable

achievements that propelled him toward Cooperstown was the exceptional feat

which was frequently recalled and documented during this recent 2008 Summer

Olympic festival. Montgomery County’s Lasorda had already been enshrined in

baseball’s Hall of Fame when he coached the United States Baseball Team to the

2002 Olympics Baseball championship. Culminating the team’s march to the Gold

was the exciting upset over heavily favored Cuba in the finale.